Exercise plays a vital role in not only our physical wellbeing but also our mental wellbeing. The phrase “runners high” is due to the rush of happy hormones after exercise, endorphins, serotonin, and dopamine. So, let’s find out how to boost your mood with some exercise!

How Exercise Boosts Your Mood

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Just 20-minutes of light exercise is enough to significantly boost dopamine. In HIIT training however your brain starts to release dopamine after a couple of minutes. This makes you more focussed, alert and improving your concentration.  The more often you train the more dopamine will be released, pushing you to keep challenging yourself & consequently building your confidence.

Serotonin is a hormonal antagonist to dopamine and has a variety of functions; amongst other things, it’s involved in the regulation of the circadian rhythm – basically runs your sleep cycle.  It also controls our appetite and lowers pain sensitivity. It’s primarily known as a feel-good hormone because its release leads to a feeling of inner satisfaction. This is why you feel so great immediately after a difficult workout.

Make it About the Fun

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At moderate training intensities, the gratifying feelings caused by the release of endorphins promotes habitual exercise. So, its key to find a form of exercise you enjoy and will therefore stay consistent with. It may be a jog round your local park, you could go on long walks with a friend, try a dance class, a HIIT class, yoga, weight training, bike ride…the possibilities are endless! 

Gym classes like F45 are a great way to form bonds with other likeminded people too, and the community spirit is another mood booster to add onto the post workout buzz.

Short and intense exercise also reduces the level of the stress hormone cortisol, even in the long run. Your resilience concerning stress increases, whether the stress is physical or mental. 

Don’t Overdo it!

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Too much exercising can also have an opposite effect and turn up your cortisol level, your body views overtraining as negative stress. So always listen to your body, 30+ minutes of exercise 4-5 times a week is perfect, with at least one or two rest days where you could focus on stretching and restorative yoga.

Every time you feel a sense of achievement after a workout, your self-confidence will grow and this, in turn, pushes you to achieve even more. In the long run, you will not only get fitter and more athletic, but also more confident, satisfied, optimistic, powerful, and happier!

You will be able to find ideas this year on The Wonderment to boost your mood. Don’t forget to join the conversation over on social media too. You can find us on TikTok, Instagram, Threads, Facebook and Twitter.

Christina Chan
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Finding her love for health and fitness through her college lacrosse team, Cristina Chan is passionate about understanding and supporting the connection between mind and body. A qualified personal trainer and corrective exercise specialist, Cristina joined F45 Training in 2019 as a trainer at the Venice studio. In 2020, Cristina expanded her role to become an F45 Recovery Athlete, guiding members around the world through F45’s functional flexibility sessions. Designed to complement F45 Training sessions, F45 Recovery sessions focus on low-intensity, slow and controlled movements to support postural awareness, mobility, flexibility and body alignment.

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Finding her love for health and fitness through her college lacrosse team, Cristina Chan is passionate about understanding and supporting the connection between mind and body. A qualified personal trainer and corrective exercise specialist, Cristina joined F45 Training in 2019 as a trainer at the Venice studio. In 2020, Cristina expanded her role to become an F45 Recovery Athlete, guiding members around the world through F45’s functional flexibility sessions. Designed to complement F45 Training sessions, F45 Recovery sessions focus on low-intensity, slow and controlled movements to support postural awareness, mobility, flexibility and body alignment.

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